Secondary Management Zones

Secondary Management Zones (SMZ), shown in yellow on this map, are areas within the state where elk are present but are adjacent to, or outside of, core habitat, and thus no specific elk management goals are set by the NMDGF.

Private Land Elk Licenses in the SMZ are Issued Over the Counter to Hunters on an Unlimited Basis

Elk hunting on private lands in Secondary Management Zones (SMZ) differs from Primary and Special Management Zones in the sense that the NMDGF does not control the number of private land hunting licenses in the SMZ.

Ranches in Primary (PMZ) and Special Management Zones (SPZ) are allocated a specific number of private land elk hunting authorizations from the NMDGF based on the ranch habitat score and the local elk herd objectives of the NMDGF.  The NMDGF controls the supply of private land elk licenses in the PMZ and SPZ.

In Secondary Management Zones, the supply of elk licenses is unlimited, other than being controlled by how many hunters a landowner grants access to their ranch.

Elk licenses for EPLUS-enrolled private lands (i.e., those with an authorized Ranch Code) in Secondary Management Zones are issued over-the-counter (OTC) to hunters who have written permission from the landowner and are available for purchase from the NMDGF with the appropriate ranch code1.

In SMZs, unlimited private-land licenses are available to residents and non-residents on an over-the-counter basis.

GMUOwnership

The Secondary Management Zones are shown in yellow on this map.  Primary Management Zones are shown in green, and Special Management Zones in blue Move the slider overlay to see the land ownership parcels.

Distribution of over-the-counter private land elk licenses on ranches in the Secondary Management Zone

Elk licenses for EPLUS-enrolled private lands (i.e., those with an authorized Ranch Code) in Secondary Management Zones are issued over-the-counter (OTC) to hunters who have written permission from the landowner and are available for purchase from the NMDGF with the appropriate ranch code2.

In SMZs, unlimited private-land licenses are available to residents and non-residents on an over-the-counter basis.

The distribution of over-the-counter (OTC) private land licenses in the Secondary Management Zone (SMZ) for 2022 is shown in these charts.  The same data is shown in both charts; the chart on the right is plotted on a log-log scale to check for a power law distribution and to better see the tail of the distribution where a small number of ranches have a high number of OTC licenses. Power law distributions are ubiquitous in economics, especially in relation to the distribution of “wealth” or other scarce resources3 The Pareto Principle, also called the “80/20 rule”, where 20% of a population owns 80% of the scarce resource, is an example of a power-law distribution.  The data only approximate a true power-law distribution of about 20 licenses per ranch.  After that, the number of OTC licenses per ranch drops off faster than a power law predicts.

The distribution of over-the-counter (OTC) private land licenses in the Secondary Management Zone (SMZ) for 2021 is shown in these charts.  The same data is shown in both charts; the chart on the right is plotted on a log-log scale to check for a power law distribution and to better see the tail of the distribution where a small number of ranches have a high number of OTC licenses. Power law distributions are ubiquitous in economics, especially in relation to the distribution of “wealth” or other scarce resources4 The Pareto Principle, also called the “80/20 rule”, where 20% of a population owns 80% of the scarce resource, is an example of a power-law distribution.  The data only approximate a true power-law distribution of about 15 licenses per ranch.  After that, the number of OTC licenses per ranch drops off faster than a power law predicts.

The distribution of over-the-counter (OTC) private land licenses in the Secondary Management Zone (SMZ) for 2020 is shown in these charts.  The same data is shown in both charts; the chart on the right is plotted on a log-log scale to check for a power law distribution and to better see the tail of the distribution where a small number of ranches have a high number of OTC licenses. Power law distributions are ubiquitous in economics, especially in relation to the distribution of “wealth” or other scarce resources5 The Pareto Principle, also called the “80/20 rule”, where 20% of a population owns 80% of the scarce resource, is an example of a power-law distribution.  The data only approximate a true power-law distribution of about 15 licenses per ranch.  After that, the number of OTC licenses per ranch drops off faster than a power law predicts.

  1. https://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/hunting/maps/eplus/
  2. https://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/hunting/maps/eplus/
  3. Gabaix, Xavier. 2016. Power Laws in Economics: An Introduction.” Journal of Economic Perspectives30 (1): 185-206.DOI: 10.1257/jep.30.1.185
  4. Gabaix, Xavier. 2016. Power Laws in Economics: An Introduction.” Journal of Economic Perspectives30 (1): 185-206.DOI: 10.1257/jep.30.1.185
  5. Gabaix, Xavier. 2016. Power Laws in Economics: An Introduction.” Journal of Economic Perspectives30 (1): 185-206.DOI: 10.1257/jep.30.1.185